Order Diptera

(True Flies)

Domain: EucaryaKingdom: AnimaliaPhylum: ArthropodaClass: Insecta Order Phenology

Families of the Order Diptera Discovered in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Family Common Name Photo Example Where? Phenology
AgromyzidaeLeaf-miner flies(not available) HerePhenology
AnthomyiidaeRoot-maggot flies(not available) HerePhenology
AsilidaeRobber flies HerePhenology
AthericidaeWatersnipe flies(not available) HerePhenology
BlephariceridaeNet-winged midges(not available) HerePhenology
BombyliidaeBee flies HerePhenology
CalliphoridaeBlow flies, Bluebottles, Cluster flies, Greenbottles(not available) HerePhenology
CecidomyiidaeGall gnats and Gall midges HerePhenology
CeratopogonidaeMidges(not available) HerePhenology
ChaoboridaePhantom midges(not available) HerePhenology
ChironomidaeMidges(not available) HerePhenology
ClusiidaeDruid flies(not available) HerePhenology
ConopidaeThick-headed flies(not available) HerePhenology
CulicidaeMosquitoes HerePhenology
CylindrotomidaeLong-bodied Craneflies(not available) HerePhenology
Diptera_familyTrue Flies(not available) HerePhenology
DixidaeMeniscus midges(not available) HerePhenology
DolichopodidaeLong-legged flies HerePhenology
DryomyzidaeDryomyzid flies(not available) HerePhenology
EmpididaeBalloon flies, dance flies(not available) HerePhenology
EphydridaeShore flies(not available) HerePhenology
HeleomyzidaeHeleomyzid flies(not available) HerePhenology
HippoboscidaeLouse flies(not available) HerePhenology
LauxaniidaeBeach flies(not available) HerePhenology
LeptogastridaeFlies(not available) HerePhenology
LimoniidaeLimoniid Craneflies HerePhenology
LonchaeidaeLanceflies(not available) HerePhenology
LonchopteridaeSpear-winged flies(not available) HerePhenology
MuscidaeFace flies, horn flies, house flies, stable flies, tsetse flies(not available) HerePhenology
OdiniidaeOdiniid flies(not available) HerePhenology
OestridaeWoodtunnel flies(not available) HerePhenology
PallopteridaeFlutter-wing flies(not available) HerePhenology
PediciidaeHairy-eyed Craneflies(not available) HerePhenology
PhoridaeFlies(not available) HerePhenology
PipunculidaeBig-headed flies(not available) HerePhenology
PlatystomatidaeSignal flies(not available) HerePhenology
PsilidaeRust flies(not available) HerePhenology
PsychodidaeMoth flies(not available) HerePhenology
PtychopteridaePhantom Craneflies(not available) HerePhenology
PyrgotidaePicture-winged flies HerePhenology
RhagionidaeSnipe flies(not available) HerePhenology
RhinophoridaeBlack bristly flies(not available) HerePhenology
SarcophagidaeFlesh flies(not available) HerePhenology
ScathophagidaeDung flies(not available) HerePhenology
SciomyzidaeMarsh flies(not available) HerePhenology
SimuliidaeBlack flies, buffalo gnats(not available) HerePhenology
StratiomyidaeSoldier flies(not available) HerePhenology
SyrphidaeFlower flies HerePhenology
TabanidaeClegs, deer flies, horse flies(not available) HerePhenology
TanyderidaePrimitive crane flies(not available) HerePhenology
TephritidaeFruit flies(not available) HerePhenology
ThaumaleidaeSolitary midges(not available) HerePhenology
TherevidaeStiletto flies(not available) HerePhenology
TipulidaeCommon Craneflies HerePhenology
TrichoceridaeWinter Craneflies(not available) HerePhenology
UlidiidaePicture-winged flies(not available) HerePhenology
XylomyidaeWood soldier flies(not available) HerePhenology

Can't find the families you are looking for? Note:
Families on this list are only those contained in the ATBI database,
and do not neccessarily include all Park families from historic park reports, literature,
or other sources that have not yet been entered in the Biodiversity Database.
Also note: where the family name ends with '_family', it means that the family
name has not yet been agreed upon by taxonomists for this group,
or that it was not identified to this level.

In Case You Didn't Know ...
Diptera, or flies, are distinguishable by their single pair of wings. They also have mouthparts adapted for piercing, sucking or lapping and most have compound eyes.
This order is mostly known from its household pest and blood-sucking representatives, such as the black fly and mosquitos; however there are several species who have a very important role in plant pollination, scavenging, and controlling various insect pests. Prior to DLIA, there were only about 800 known species in the Park; now there are an amazing 2,048 species of flies! 1,193 records are new for the Park and 55 are new to Science!

Taxon References for Diptera

1.) Integrated Taxonomic Information System. 2007. On-line database, http://www.itis.gov.
2.) Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online), http://animaldiversity.org.
3.) Oosterbroek, P. (2005) Catalogue of the Craneflies of the World. Available from http://ip30.eti.uva.nl/ccw/ (accessed 11March 2005).
4.) Peterson, M. J., Parker, C. R., Bernard, E. (2005) The crane flies (Diptera: Tipuloidea) of Great Smoky Mountains National Park